Young adults ‘drinking themselves to death,’ as alcohol-related liver disease deaths rise

By Jennifer Ortiz

Front Page News

Deaths from cirrhosis–the late stages of liver damage–jumped by 65 percent between 1999 and 2016. The biggest group of victims were people between the ages of 25 and 34 and the major cause was alcohol. (Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — New data suggest young adults are drinking themselves to death, and Maryland is the only state in which the cirrhosis mortality rate is improving.

According to data published in the journal BMJ, deaths from cirrhosis — the late stages of liver damage — jumped by 65 percent between 1999 and 2016. The biggest group of victims were people between the ages of 25 and 34 and the major cause was alcohol.

In 2016, 11,073 people died due to liver cancer, double the number of such deaths in 1999.

Cirrhosis can be caused by a virus like hepatitis C or fatty liver disease, and as liver specialists have made strides in fighting hepatitis C, “We thought we would see improvements, but these data make it clear: even after hepatitis C, we will still have our work cut out for us,” said liver specialist Dr. Elliot B. Tapper.

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